The 10 Misconceptions of Trip Managers 

Being a Trip Manager means you just get to drink and party all the time right? Wrong! The misconception of the life as a trip manager is something we all find pretty common.

Being a Trip Manager
Being a Trip Manager

Here are the top ten misconceptions of Trip Managers who take bunches of 50 youths around a continent.

1. Yes we party, but not all the time– We visit some of the world’s best party cities and trust me when I say that we enjoy having a boogie but we can’t always show you our winning dance moves (of which we have many). Getting very little sleep is normal and it sometimes means that we have to do the occasional ‘smoke bomb’. This ninja-like move is when we walk around; check that you are all having the best time and then ‘poof’ we disappear.

We do this knowing that you are going to have a great night regardless and that we will be the ones working the next morning while you attempt to cure a hangover. Do be aware though, that when we do pick a night to party we usually go hard and it means you may need to clear the dance floor and we will usually be in the last taxi home.

2. We are not human- This common misconception is felt by many in the industry. Now I know that sometimes it may seem as though we are robots; finely tuned with genius minds which never switch off but really we are not. Being human, as you may know, means that we have our ups and downs just like anyone else. We have to smile and be accommodating, that’s an essential part of our job but being human means we may have a day where we are sad, tired or do not want to be disturbed because we want to have a quick shower at the end of a long day.

St Mark's Square- Venice
St Mark’s Square- Venice

3. We know it all- So many people ask how we can remember as much as we do and when you work as a trip manager you are able to retain plenty of information but that doesn’t mean that we know it all. We are always learning and we may not have the answer for you but we are willing to find out or to listen to a fun fact that you have to share.

It is impossible for someone to know everything and this also means that sometimes we get lost; yes that’s correct. Sometimes we take a wrong turn in cities we know but most of the time you won’t even notice because we don’t want you to have to worry.

4. We don’t know the gossip on the coach- Please don’t be fooled. We know exactly what is going on. Organised group tours often have a feeling similar to what we all experienced in high school. There are groups of friends; some outgoing others a little shy and people who end up in a relationship on tour. Don’t think that we are oblivious to these happenings. We are always listening and just because it’s hasn’t been explicitly said that people didn’t spend the evening in their room doesn’t mean it’s not, almost always, noticeable the very next morning.

5. We don’t have lives outside of tour- We are faithful to you always, for 24 hours of the day you are in our care but sometimes we get to grab a few minutes to ourselves and in that time we will do normal things. We have family and friends who want to hang out and chat just as you do in your day to day life. We have hobbies and interest which extend well beyond our work and when your tour is finished; unless you were someone we genuinely enjoyed spending time with, we will part ways, continue with our lives as you continue with yours.

6. We haven’t done this before and have no idea what we are doing- no matter how many tours you have been on our how many times you may have visited a particular city you are not the Trip Manager. I’m sure you would be a little grumpy if someone came into your place of work and told you how to do your job so please don’t tell us how to do ours. Which leads to the next point

There is always time for a selfie
There is always time for a selfie

7. Anyone can get this job- We go through some of the longest and most intense training of all companies globally. No matter which company takes you on your tour rest assured that trip managers have put the blood sweat and endless tears into getting our dream job. Each year youth travel companies receive thousands of applications and companies will maybe employ around thirty to forty of those applicants; those aren’t great odds unless you work your butt off.

8. A tour just happens- The amount of work that goes behind a tour is staggering and it goes well beyond just the role of the trip manager. Our offices have teams who organise these trips and take the worry out of it for you. They probably have a fair few grey hairs for organising every aspect of the tour up to a year in advance. Have a think about the hotels, dinners, transport, drivers, activities, ferries, flights and activities, these things only cover the tip of the iceberg. This is why you booked a group tour, for us to take the hassle out of you having to organise it all yourself. You’re job is to be on holiday while we do the work remembering it is not only your driver and trip manager who make it happen.

9. We like you all- This may be the hardest blow for some of you but with every tour taking fifty travellers around continents we sometimes encounter people that we get on better with than with others. This is the way life works and there will be people you like and dislike. Just because you may not be someone we connect with as much doesn’t mean that you will have less of an incredible experience. We have to be professional, treat people equally and with respect but if you are not going to reciprocate that behaviour then don’t expect us to be best buddies outside of your tour.

10. We are on holiday- So many people assume that because we travel for work that we are on holiday; this couldn’t be more untrue. If we were on holiday we would be sitting next to you on the coach not at the front with mounds of paperwork and a list of endless tasks each day. If we look like we are having a good time it’s because we have managed to get all of our work done prior and because if we didn’t look like we were having a good time you may question if you were.

We Sphinx Egypt is Amazing
We Sphinx Egypt is Amazing

These misconceptions are common but our line of work lends to them but there aren’t many people in the industry who would trade it for anything else because we do have the best job in the world. We often take it for granted but it is a job and it does see us working hard to ensure that you have the best time possible.

We do have fun on a daily basis and most of that can be attributed to all of you who put trust in us to show you some of the most unique and fascinating places. You teach us things along the way and while you are busy making memories that you will cherish and hold dear; we are too and you are part of them and we wouldn’t want it any other way.

The Final Countdown-Contiki Training Part Six

It has been nearly a year since Contiki training started and the feeling of finishing that trip is possibly the greatest achievement in my short 23 years on this beautiful planet.

The final stages of the Contiki Training Trip were possibly the most difficult. Following the ‘Zombie Stage’ comes the stage where everything becomes a bit of a blur. Eastern Europe felt so rushed, we travelled through more than one country a day and as soon as we finished studying one we were hurtled into another.

The cities began to look the same and the routine of each day became like that of ‘Ground Hog Day’ just with a different background.

Highlighters marked each completed day and the closer we got to the end the more it began to dawn on me and others that we were going to do this, that we were going to successfully complete training and be signing a contract with Contiki, the World’s number one tour company for 18-35 year olds.

It is the most testing thing I have ever done and one that makes me proud every day. I pushed through with my colleagues and we finished together. Sixty six long days; we were grumpy, tired, emotional and occasionally snapped at each other but all worked endlessly to get through.

So many of my readers are going on this journey themselves. Jumping into the relatively unknown and attempting to land the job that I consider to be the best in the world (I know this may sound cliché but it is true).

To all of you who are on this years training trip or to anybody who is considering it in the future; work hard. Nothing is ever easy and you will be testing to your physical and mental limits. You may find that there will be days that you want to quit and throw in the towel, where getting out of bed seems impossible but really it is not.

Training is designed to test you and just remember that you have already put in some of the hard yards; you have gone through the interviewing process, been accepted and hopefully poured your heart and soul into the assignment.

Contiki saw something in you, a little sparkle and they are giving you a shot, a big opportunity. Show them what you have got and more importantly prove to yourself what you can do.

Give it your all; head down and bottom up, don’t think that you know it all because you most certainly do not. Do what you are told, get the work done and most importantly remember to enjoy yourself.

Training allows you to see some of the most incredible places in all of Europe so wake up each day with a fresh outlook, smile, laugh and stay off of the caffeine tablets!

I won’t say good luck because luck has nothing to do with it, work hard and hopefully I will see you on the road.

Enter Zombie Phase-Contiki Training Part Five

We have all had those days where getting out of bed seems near impossible; where turning over and going back into a heavy dose trumps doing anything else, your body aches, you feel heavy and your brain is wondering if you are dreaming or if you are awake. NO! You are not dreaming, get up, GET UP!

You think that is bad for one or two days? Well try having that same feeling every single day for 66 days. Surviving on very little sleep was probably the biggest challenge for most of us on Contiki training. It allowed us to enter a phase that most dare not enter for fear that they will never return; the Zombie Phase.

WAKE UPNow when I say Zombie I don’t mean the human eating kind; with rags for clothes, red eyes and arms directly in front as they wander in your direction and you run screaming. No I mean the kind where everything is an effort and where each minute you are fighting sleep with your eyelids feeling weighted and the pen in your hand slipping off your sheet of paper.

You may be wondering how this is humanly possible? Living on less than four hours each night, running around cities all day, consuming more information than you every thought you could. The truth is I have no idea how I did it.

If training taught me one thing it was that I would be able to push myself further than I ever thought I could. Getting out of bed each morning was agony and having to endure the same belittlement and anxiety at the thought of having to do a speech, I may not have got round to the night before, was horrifying. So many days I felt myself living for the moment that I could fall into bed, absolutely exhausted and slip into a deep sleep that if it were up to me would last an eternity.

Sleepy Lucas
Sleepy Lucas

Each drive day there was always one person who would nod off and we each had a strategy to not get caught. Firstly you needed the help of your buddy, the person sitting next to you. You would inform them that you were going to try and grab a quick micro sleep.

Micro sleep:

Noun

Defined by all Contiki trainees as a recurring period of between 2 and 10 minutes on a Contiki coach in which the nervous system is inactive, the eyes closed, the postural muscles relaxed, and consciousness practically suspended until violently woken by your buddy.

Secondly you needed to make sure you looked like you were doing something. The trick was to deceive your trainer. We did this by making sure our papers were on our lap, pen in hand, looking down to ensure we looked like we were working.

Lastly you had to be quiet about it; snoring would instantly give you away and if you looked odd or in the least bit funny; you risked alerting fellow trainees who would giggle, point and take photos of you as they tried to stick their finger up your nose.

Unfortunately sleeping on training is not allowed and the violent shove you got from your buddy was enough to alert you that the trainer is looking your way and that the pen, which a second ago lay limp in your hand, needed to be scribbling down something mildly relative to European subject matter.

The most entertaining part of my day was watching others take their micro sleep. Heads fell back and tongues flailed to the side, all while our pens were resting on our pages with tiny words scribbled down, slowly forming a long solid blue line from the minute we began falling asleep. I watched my buddy draw on his own hand for a solid four minutes while falling asleep, convinced he was still awake and writing an incredible history.

Ian working hard
Ian working hard

The Zombie Phase was made worse by some with the use of ‘No Doz’; a caffeine tablet to help relieve mental fatigue and drowsiness, helping you stay alert and awake. That is all fine and well, until you have been living off of caffeine tablets for more than two weeks.

You have endless shakes, paranoia, little sleep and a huge crash an hour after consumption. One Contiki trainee has told me she thought that they were going to kill her by the end, causing her to break out into spontaneous fits of tears, pull out her hair and vomit on a constant basis; not pretty. My advice; avoid all of that kind of stuff and ensure you are eating healthy and opt for coffee rather than a tablet solution.

Entering the Zombie Phase sounds frightening and alarming; I can assure you it is but that is the time where you need to push harder than before. You need to try and stay awake, pay attention and absorb everything around you. One thing I wish I had done was to pay more attention on training.

Enter Zombie Phase
Enter Zombie Phase

Prioritise your time on the coach and work as hard as you can, leaving the late nights for what they are meant for; much needed rest before that alarm goes off and the Zombie Phase starts all over again.

“Give Me the Route For Today”-Contiki Training Part Four

It takes two to tango and it takes two to run a successful Contiki tour. It’s not all about the Tour Manager, the person who sits behind the wheel deserves some recognition because ultimately they carry 50 budding travellers safely around Europe. This one is for the Drivers.

As tough as training for Contiki was, we all eventually began to get used to the endless grind, the constant questioning and the fact that no matter how well we thought we were doing there was always room for improvement. We soon realised that this job would ensure we were constantly learning and if we did make a mistake we had to recognise it, learn from it and ensure that it didn’t happen again.

Often our mistakes could be put down to the fact that we were stupidly tired. On average we got about five to six hours sleep a night, if not less. I for one love an average of about nine and can survive on less but with full eighteen hour days where you run around and try and consume as much information as humanly possible it can begin to take it’s toll.

Coach days, where you travel from one location to the next, were notorious for having at least one person nod off from sheer exhaustion. The ‘to be’ tour managers weren’t the only ones to endure the gruesome sixty-six day training; the ‘to be’ drivers accompanied us.

Each morning they were tasked with explaining the route we would take to each destination, how far it was and calculate which services we were to use. Equipped with European road atlases we were on our way. Contiki don’t condone the use of GPS navigation devices during training, so how would you find your way around a bustling city if you couldn’t read a map while driving? The answer; route notes.

We were issued two standard lined books and notepads, which after many a late night and red palms, were perfectly ruled to specific measurements (checked by our trainers) allowing for precise route notes of Europe. As tour managers we also ruled these books but didn’t do nearly as many route notes as the drivers.

We had two trainers, one who focused more on training us tour managers and the other the drivers. Each day our driver trainer sat the front of the coach and using the microphone would read a series of route notes. These would then be drawn, neatly and with a ruler might I add, into the margins. So if we were to turn left and traffic lights we would draw an arrow left following traffic lights and so on.

The drivers did this relentlessly and were often jolted awake by the announcement of “route note” over the microphone. Each day they had to sit on the window and observe road signs, now this doesn’t sound so bad if you are an average height but nearly every driver on our training was above average. We had a variety of European drivers, many Portuguese. I’m not sure what the Portuguese feed their boys but they sure are tall! Sitting on the window took it’s toll on the 6 foot 4 inch plus frames of our drivers.

When they weren’t scribbling route notes, filling out worksheets, staring out the window or trying with all their might to stay awake they had to endure us! Each day we were called up to practice the speeches we had written, sometimes five minutes before, and since we couldn’t plug in an iPod and listen to music we all became the audience.

As tour managers we were often busy enough to continue the speech we were working on and block out whoever was speaking, our drivers didn’t have this luxury. They had to endure every speech. From histories to city introductions, city tours and socio economic talks, with not very many being remotely good or interesting on the very first try. Quite frankly, I’m not sure how they did it.

The incredible Bob
The incredible Bob

Each day a new driver was selected to be the ‘driver of the day’ and along with an accompanied tour manager they would run the day as if on tour. Now picture yourself driving and trying to reverse parallel park an average sized car down tiny European streets with crazy drivers surrounding you, honking their horns because you are in the way or because their patience level is at zero. It can be stressful and make you a little nervous. Now imagine doing it in a 13 metre coach with fifty passengers scrutinising your every move. It is no easy feat.

Our driver trainer is one of the most patient and calm people I have met and I take my hat off to him with the amount of patience he showed to our drivers on training. Allowing each driver to grow in confidence behind the wheel of the giant coaches which scatter the European continent each year.

I never gave the drivers enough credit during training, always thinking that we were working harder as tour managers, but I was so wrong. After a season on the road I have begun to appreciate my drivers more each time and the hard work and effort they put in to making each tour a success. They are the support system of the tour manager and become friends rather than colleagues. Their abilities amaze me, their sheer patience to put up with some of our crazy tour manager antics is endless.

It takes two to tango and while some may have two left feet, they are always willing to dance.

“Is This All Worth It?”-Contiki Training Part Three

Lao Tzu, an ancient Chinese philosopher once said “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”

Sometimes we do things in life and later question if the decision we made was worth it. Is becoming a Contiki Tour Manager worth it?

Being a Contiki Tour Manager is not for everyone and on training a few people fell by the wayside and decided to leave while others left on their own accord.

It takes a certain person to do this job and if you happen to be reading this blog for an insight then let me be honest with you; it is no walk in the park and if you think it’s going to be some kind of holiday you are sadly mistaken. From the moment you wake till the instant you go to sleep your brain is buzzing.

On training the only time you get to yourself is in the shower or when you sleep, even that is limited. You get off the coach and run in cities you have never seen, hoping you are running in the correct direction. Your actions get questioned on a daily basis and often you find out that the running you did, around the city you have never seen, was not as beneficial than if you had you run in another direction. The trainers push you harder each day, testing your patience and ability to remember facts on the spot.

You drag yourself out of bed every morning after a few hours sleep, you try your hardest to keep your eyes open on the coach when all they seem to want to do is close and on a daily basis you get told that you are not good enough and need to improve.

Is it all worth it you may be asking? Well the proof is in the pudding. This is the most incredible job, many say it’s the best job in the world, and being away from it during the Christmas season has made me realise that this is true.

Never before have I heard of a job that allows for so much personal development, one where you hop on the coach in the morning in one country and you are in a new country by lunch time. Where you meet incredible people from all walks of life and experience different cultures while sharing memories with clients and colleagues that become your best friends.

I don’t find that I am the same person I was before Contiki, I am a better version of myself. I think I can speak for many of the tour managers when I say that training and life on the road changes you.

What are these changes you may be wondering? Well it took me a while to figure it out for myself.

I have fewer plans, perhaps you can say I am more of a free spirit or a nomad. Before Contiki I always had a set plan; I was to finish university, get a top paying job, find a place to live, get a boyfriend and a dog and settle.

Settle? The last thing I want now is to settle! So what if I don’t know where I am going to be in 5 years and I don’t have a structured plan for the way my life ‘should’ turn out? I am living life to the fullest, seeing more of the world than most and having the adventure of a lifetime. The wise Lao Tzu also said “A good traveller has no fixed plans and is not intent on arriving.”

Travelling opens your eyes to the big wide world and when you travel you see the world a little differently. You develop a profound appreciation for the way that other countries and cultures work, understanding what makes them tick.

It’s like leaning how to swim; you are thrown on the deep end, without floating armbands to bring you to the top, but eventually you learn to paddle your way to the edge and before you know it you are swimming with a huge grin on your face.

Not many things are easy the first time round but once you get used to it you find you improve. You begin to swim in places where before you felt like you were drowning.

Working with people and ensuring you have effective communication skills, that transcend cultural boundaries, is something you learn through this job. Working with people is not easy and often presents itself with challenges that make you rethink your approach. I have learnt patience working as a Tour Manager and figured out ways to communicate in different situations.

Like any job there are days that are more testing than others but there has not been one day where I have not wanted to be working as a Tour Manager. Or where I have questioned my decision to pack my bags, leave my friends and family for an adventurous life on the road. I know that they are there supporting me with every step I take.

So if you are questioning whether to do the same, or are at a crossroads in life without any idea of which way to turn remember this;

The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step” It may be time to take that step.

“Start Again”- Contiki Training Part Two

Jim Rohn, a motivational speaker said “Discipline is the bridge between goals and accomplishment.”

If there was one thing I learnt from training with Contiki it was that we would train with discipline. Continuously repeating ourselves and by learning through our failures and turning our goals into accomplishments throughout the sixty six day training, no matter how small.

Our first week was held in Hopfgarten where we all piled into our rooms as quick as we could. Next we were given the near impossible ‘reckie’ (short for reconnaissance) task of going down to town, a twenty-minute walk at best, and finding out all that we could about the area as well as getting back to the accommodation and finding out everything that we could about the accommodation. We were given forty-five minutes for the task, a task that would take any normal person an hour and a half to complete.

Here is the thing about our training, they didn’t want ordinary, they wanted us to push our boundaries and go from ordinary to something that resembles extraordinary, without getting cocky.

Not one of us completed the task successfully; we had failed, not as individuals but as a whole. This would not be the first time we failed.

Every morning we were tasked with completing tour codes, reciting ten different tours offered by Contiki and stating how long each tour stayed in various European cities. Now reading this you may think it was a piece of cake, on the contrary it was so nerve-wracking. We all dread that moment in school when we are asked to get up and present something that we know we have not prepared. The seemingly simple task of reciting and repeating tour codes took that feeling to an entirely new level.

We all sat in absolute silence, not daring to make eye contact with our first trainer. The cliché about being able to cut the tension with a knife was dead on and never mind hearing a pin drop on the floor, you could hear the heartbeat of the person sitting next to you. You dreaded hearing your name called, not because you didn’t necessarily know the sequence but because you did not want to mess it up in front of your trainer.

I remember the moment I was first called up to recite a forty-five day tour. I am not one to get nervous but I was shaking. I fumbled more than once, each time I was incorrect I was told “Start Again”, this method made me completely forget my train of thought and made me stumble more until I was ordered to sit down.

I lost so much confidence in myself, I was so close and to have to start over several times taught me something about myself; I wasn’t willing to give up not on myself or my trainers. Now this may sound brutal; losing confidence but we were broken down to be brought back up, we needed to be disciplined in order to make our goal of becoming a tour manager a reality and one my best accomplishments to date.

A Time for Smiling- Contiki Training Part One

Many have asked me about the training trip with Contiki and for a while I have thought about how and when I would write about it. Having just finished my first season and having been offered regional training next year, the time is now.

I simply cannot condense the immense training trip into one article and so I have broken into more manageable bite size chunks for your enjoyment.

I am not one to beat around the bush and I say things as they are without the cushion people crave. The 66 day training trip to become a tour manager with Contiki is the most difficult and challenging thing I have ever done but also the most rewarding.

I wouldn’t be where I am now without the support of my fellow trainees some of whom I met before our journey began through the marvels of today’s technology. Prior to leaving Australia a handful of eager, want to be tour managers, including me, decided it was a good idea to go to Paris for a week before the madness began and try and come to grips with one of the most visited cities in Europe.

Snow! There is a first time for everything.
Snow for the first time.

From our assignment we knew that we would have to name and recite facts of over fifty monuments and places of interest before we could come to grips with what being a tour manager entails. I thought that was a challenge, I was in over my head.

We pranced around Paris in the snow, getting to know each other a little more and making friendships I now cherish more than most. We visited several monuments in Paris and had a few ‘study’ sessions in our tiny but adequate Parisian apartment. I was living in the clouds thinking that this was what training would be like.

Before we were thrown into the depths of the unknown we were told we should participate in a weekend away, an opportunity to experience the product as a client. Having completed a Contiki trip myself the year before I had some idea about what to expect but there were many prospective drivers and tour managers who didn’t know what the company stood for and represented. In hindsight it was a very smart of the company to give us the opportunity to experience the product because ultimately there is no way to sell a product successfully if you don’t know what it is you are selling.

Exploring Liverpool
Exploring Liverpool

We ventured off to Liverpool to and Oxford for three days. With smiles on our faces we did what normal clients do, we got to know each other, we experienced and learnt about the new cities and had a few laughs along the way.

Arriving back in London with a smile on my face and feeling as though the weekend went well I felt prepared for what was to come. Once again, I was silly to think that I was even nearly ready for what was to come and I was quick to wipe that smile off of my face.

Next it was time for Hopfgarten week or what our trainers liked to call ‘kindergarten’ week. You need to crawl before you can walk, or run in our case and boy you had to learn quick or you wouldn’t be around for long.

That is all I am going to leave you with for now as this was the time for smiling, before the real work began and the smiles were still around but between the serious working face.

A Successful Season of Living the Dream

It is about time I got back in the saddle and wrote about the last eight crazy months of my life. 

If I look back to where I was in March of this year and the person that I am now, I am not sure I would be able to recognise myself. Contiki has changed me, changed me in ways that I didn’t think a job could.

Leaving home with a suitcase, an assignment I had put months into and butterflies in my stomach, I was excited to venture into the unknown and try something new.

Over the next few weeks I will delve into my training trip with Contiki, the ups and the downs as well as the challenges I faced in the toughest training possible. Then I will give you some insight into life on the road as a first year Contiki tour manager.

For now all I am going to say is that if you are sitting here reading this and wanting to change your life in some way; do it. Don’t wait around or make excuses because if you don’t try you will never know. I took a chance, applied on a whim and in all honesty it was the best thing that I could have done.

Contiki have an incredible marketing campaign this year. It is all about seizing the moment, and making the one life that you have count. I have jumped on this bandwagon and I am living the dream, start living yours.

Keep an eye out for some substantial articles in the coming weeks.

Let the Training Begin…

19 Countries, over 12000 KM, 68 Days; welcome to Contiki Training.

In three months I will be packing my bag for a trip that I can only describe as a once in a lifetime opportunity. A whirlwind of adventure that will see me wake up in one country and fall asleep in another, if I get any sleep at all.

Recently, I saved all of my pennies for a Contiki Trip, I travelled with a friend from London to Athens with a bunch of 50 crazy travellers, during a hot European summer, making memories that I won’t be forgetting any time soon.

Contiki
Contiki

When I returned to Australia I started my final semester at university, still unsure of what I wanted to do once I graduated. I had seen Contiki advertise a Tour Manager position for Europe and the requirements seemed simple enough; be a confident speaker, have a European passport or be able to obtain visas, to preferably have travelled before and to be bubbly and outgoing. I possess all of the above and my most treasured travel item is my EU passport.

I poured my heart into my online application and a month later I was flying to Sydney for a group interview at Contiki HQ. With 20 people in the group interview the vibe was tense, many crumbled under the pressure when giving their speeches, myself included. I picked it up where I left off and after a long and stressful group interview, I scored myself a personal interview that same afternoon.

Never have I been in an personal interview that challenged me more. Trying to get a smile out of my interviewers was near impossible and serious thought went into each and every answer I gave. I walked out not knowing what to expect, all I knew was that in two weeks I would have my answer.

The email I had been waiting for.
The email I had been waiting for.

Two weeks later I was hurtled out of bed with the news that I had been accepted on the training trip. I laughed, cried and jumped at the good news. I’ve never wanted anything so badly before. Since returning from my last Contiki, I have had an urge to travel, to explore and to see the world from a different perspective, now I have that chance.

March will see me leave Australia for eight months and endure a challenging training trip before being offered a position as a Contiki Tour Manager in Europe. I am currently completing a huge assignment to help me prepare for my trip.

19 Countries, 12000 KM, 68 Days
19 Countries, 12000 KM, 68 Days

Overwhelmed and excited are two words I would use to describe how I feel about jetting off to Europe and when I mapped out my trip I figured out that I will be visiting 19 countries, covering about 12 000 KM, all in just 68 days. Not very many people can say that they have done that. I simply cannot wait.

So  sure to follow me by email to keep an eye on La Petite Globetrotter for tales from my crazy European adventure.

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